Kamut Bread

  

Have you heard of Kamut (pronounced kah-MOOT)? Kamut is an ancient variation of wheat under a brand name. The type of grain (wheat) is khorasan and it is described as an “ancient relative of modern durum wheat originating in the Fertile Crescent region reaching from Mesopotamia to Egypt. KAMUT® brand khorasan wheat is always grown organically, has never been hybridized or genetically modified, and has high quality standards.”  Read more about Kamut brand grain.

The advantages of using Kamut are many, either for people who cannot tolerate modern wheat, sometimes they can eat Kamut, or just to add a new dimension to your baking, the flavor of Kamut is rich and buttery and it has a light, springy texture that works well in breads, cakes, muffins, cookies and even pasta!

Try adding Kamut brand khorasan grain into your regular recipes and enjoy.

KAMUT BREAD 
Yield: 4 loaves

Mill whole Kamut grain into flour with WonderMill grain mill

Place in a mixer or mixing bowl:
4 cups warm water (110 degrees)
4 cups Kamut flour, freshly-ground
1 Tablespoon SAF instant yeast
1 teaspoon organic apple cider vinegar (optional)

Mix well until it forms a batter-like consistency. Cover and let sit for 30 minutes to sponge.

Stir down batter and add:      

1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil, or organic coconut oil, melted
1/2 cup raw honey
1/2 cup vital gluten flour (optional)
1 teaspoon salt
Additional freshly-ground Kamut, enough to make a study but moist dough, approximately 4-5 cups. Only add enough flour to have the dough form a ball and pull away from the sides of the bowl. Mix well until dough holds together.

If using a stand mixer, knead on medium-low for 5 minutes, or until dough is smooth and springy, but not sticky. If kneading by hand, this will take 10-12 minutes on an oiled surface.

Cover and let rise in a warm place until doubled, about 30-45 minutes.

Stir down dough and divide into 4 equal portions.  Shape each portion into a loaf and place in a greased loaf pan to rise. Let rise for 30-45 minutes or until loaves are domed on top and have risen about 1 -2 inches above the rim of the loaf pan. *I use the 8 x 4-inch pans.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees while the bread is rising.

When oven and bread are ready, bake for 30-35 minutes or until bread is browned. Remove bread from oven, remove the bread from the pans and place the loaves onto a wire rack cooling sheet. Cover with a clean dishcloth and let the loaves cool completely.

B’Teavon! (Bon Appetit!)

About Vickilynn Haycraft

Vickilynn Haycraft of Real Food Living has been an avid and passionate student of health and nutrition for over 30 years. For the last 25 years Vickilynn has been well-known for her experience reviewing and personally using different tools of the homemaking vocation, focusing on the areas of health and nutrition. Vickilynn is a radio show hostess, magazine columnist, trusted product reviewer, cookbook author of Wrapping It Up! and  co-author of Naturally Healthy Cuisine, Real Food for Real Families. She is also a popular and frequent guest on radio shows, expert panels, speaking engagements as well as being full-time wife, home educator and mom of 5 children. 
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11 Responses to Kamut Bread

  1. Great recipe, I have been looking for a good 100% KAMUT bread recipe for a while now and I like your the best. Thanks for sharing it.

  2. brenda tymko says:

    How many calories in your kamut bread.

    thank you

    • Matt L says:

      Hi Brenda,

      This took me all of about 5 minutes to do. All you do is look up the ingredients, ad the calories for them up and divide by the number of loaves.

      1740 calories per loaf. Then divide by the number of slices. If you get 10 slices then it’s 174 calories per slice.

      4680 flour
      1440 oil
      480 honey
      360 kneaded with oil

      6960 total recipe calories

  3. Stacy says:

    I tried this recipe yesterday. My dough rose beautifully. It was even nicely rounded in the pans. But during the course of baking the tops fell flat again. Do you have any suggestions for what I might have done wrong? Or how else I might correct this? I baked the bread for 30 minutes and probably should have left it in a little longer as the base is still a bit doughy. However, the tops had flattened at about 15 min into the baking process. The only change I made was to use organic coconut oil instead of the extra virgin olive oil. Thanks for your advice?

  4. Sally says:

    I was very pleased with the taste and texture of the loaf of bread made with your recipe.
    However about twenty minutes in to baking, my nicely rounded loaves flattened. I will use this recipe again.

  5. Maya says:

    if you’re loaves flattened while baking, you may not have kneaded your dough for long enough. kamut is low gluten so it won’t develop as much elasticity as wheat flour, but it should come together a bit more if you knead it for long enough.

  6. Anthony Mezz. says:

    This is the best kamut bread recipe I have made. Everyone that tastes this bread are very impressed.
    I mix toasted hemp seed, toasted flax and sesame seeds. The flavor is unbelievably good. My wife begs me to make it.
    Thank you,
    Anthony

  7. Laurie says:

    Thank-you for this great recipe! Just made it tonight and it tastes succulently good!

  8. sam says:

    Hello,

    I just bought some kamut flour to give it a try. Since it is my first time, I don’t want to make 4 loaves, so how much should I use of everything listed?

    Thanks,
    Sam

  9. TSandy says:

    I made this bread yesterday. I loved the recipe. So far it’s the best tasting, lightest, softest of the Kamut bread recipes I have tried. I am in the process of taking my family off all modern wheat and so looking for new kamut bread recipes. My only concern is the vital wheat gluten that was necessary to get the beautiful height in this loaves. I have since found a source for vital wheat gluten that comes from outside the USA and thus is healthy to consume. Thanks for a great recipe. Keep the kamut recipes coming.

  10. kim says:

    This is a large recipe. I could cut it down, but wanted to know if I was able to freeze or refrigerate it? If so when after first rise?

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